Many Rivers to Cross

- Author Monty R. Montgomery
- Publisher Simon & Schuster
- Year 1995
- First Edition
- Fine Condition
- Hardcover with Dust Wrapper
- b/w Illustrations
- Language English
- Pages 254
- Size cm 22 x 16
- ISBN 9788889468166

Ref.: 0671792865

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In the Big Dry of eastern Montana, where Monty Montgomery, grew up, paradise was climbing a thousand feet or so above the plains, sitting in the shade of a pine tree, and listening to the water run in the creek.  The best places are sill where cool, clear water runs, indigenous trout swim, and an intact ecosystem thrives. There aren't many such places left, and in Many Rivers To Cross, Monty Montgomery takes the reader on a lyrical, ruminative, wryly humorous journey into the physical and emotional territory of the American West as he explores the idea of wilderness and its enduring significance in the American psyche.

Montgomery journeys from the headwaters of the Columbia River and Hoodoo Creek in the interior of the Crow Reservation, to eastern Oregon and to Rosebud Creek, where General Custer's reinforcements camped and went fishing instead of joining the battle at Little Bighorn. Along the way, he makes stops at Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks, and traces the steps of Lewis and Clark (each of whom had a species of trout Salmo Lewisi and Salmo Clarki named after him during the nineteenth century); visiting landscapes in danger of vanishing under the tracks of tourists, land developers, and even grazing cows.

Monty Montgomery guides us through overlooked locations in Montana, Wyoming, Idaho, New Mexico, Arizona, and Oregon, all of the last best places, narrating his travels with luminous descriptions territory, peculiarly Western characters, and uncommon history. All of this is sharply observed with dry humour, as in his explanation of why it is handiest to be in Utah when one is having problems away from home, or in describing the inherent hilarity of mud volcanos. And there is, of course, the ever present quest for trout, from the Bonneville cutthroat to the rare Apache trout, all of which are ever harder to find in their natural state. Like the landscape, native trout are disappearing, overwhelmed by introduced stock. Part history, part ode, Many Rivers To Cross is a thoughtful, witty, and beautifully written meditation on the meaning and experience of wilderness.

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